What are to stay healthy Need?

How do you stay healthy? It’s a question that has boggled minds for centuries. And though it may seem simple, the answer is actually quite complex. To simplify things, we’ve put together a list of some important rules for staying healthy.

  • Eat three meals a day: Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation: Every now and then.
  • Eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables: At least five servings a day! A serving is defined as four berries or six lettuce leaves.
  • Exercise: About 30 minutes (two times a week) of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking. Other types of exercise can be great, but they must be moderated to avoid excess stress on your body.
  • Don’t smoke: Smoking can cause serious health problems and early death.
  • Don’t take drugs: Many drugs may provide temporary relief, but they weaken your defenses and leave you vulnerable to disease. The more you use them, the more likely you are to get sick.
  • Don’t get too much sun: For all ages, ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun can damage your skin and eyes. And if you burn easily, avoid extreme exposure.
  • Get the recommended amount of sleep: Most adults need seven to eight hours of sleep a night.
  • Check with your doctor about taking vitamins: If you’re concerned you’re not getting enough of certain nutrients, ask your doctor about vitamin supplements.

Footnote: All of these rules are important for staying healthy. Although you may not be able to follow them all the time, make an effort to improve one or two each month.

The following is a very simple but clear and concise version of the above.

  • “Eat three meals a day: Breakfast, lunch and dinner.”
  • “Drink alcohol in moderation: Every now and then.”
  • “Eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables: At least five servings a day! A serving is defined as four berries or six lettuce leaves.”
  • “Exercise: About 30 minutes (two times a week) of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking. Other types of exercise can be great, but they must be moderated to avoid excess stress on your body.”
  • “Don’t smoke: Smoking can cause serious health problems and early death.”
  • “Don’t get too much sun: For all ages, ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun can damage your skin and eyes. And if you burn easily, avoid extreme exposure.”
  • “Get the recommended amount of sleep: Most adults need seven to eight hours of sleep a night.
  • “Check with your doctor about taking vitamins: If you’re concerned you’re not getting enough of certain nutrients, ask your doctor about vitamin supplements.

Notice the affect the simple addition of a few words has over these versions. By adding these words, which are very commonly used in newspapers, the meaning of the sentence is made clearer for the reader. But where do these words come from?

Title:Diabetes: Strange facts about the disease and its treatment.
Better knowledge and understanding of diabetes and its treatment could help you stay healthy. So here are some interesting facts about the disease to better inform you.

  • It is a disorder in which the body can’t properly use glucose, a type of sugar that comes from the food we eat. Glucose gets into our body’s cells with the help of insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas.
  • Diabetic people often lack the hormone insulin, and because of this their bodies can’t use glucose. It can also be due to a failing pancreas, which is not producing enough insulin.
  • Insulin is produced in the pancreas to signal the body that it needs to use glucose. Hormones such as insulin prompt the body to respond by converting sugar into energy-providing cells, such as muscles and tissues.
  • Diabetes can also result from infection by the hepatitis B virus.
    Cencer:
  • There are two kinds of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2.
  • Type 1 results when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. This type is sometimes referred to as “juvenile diabetes” because it usually develops in young people, although it can occur at any age.
  • Type 2 is the most common—approximately 90 percent of all diagnosed cases are Type 2—and results when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or when cells are resistant to insulin.
  • The condition is often referred to as “adult-onset diabetes,” which describes when someone gets it early in life, but can also be known as “maturity onset diabetes” or “politically correct” insulin resistance.
    Preparation:
  • If you have diabetes, you will need to make changes in your lifestyle and the way you eat. Diabetes cannot be cured, but a certain amount of exercise and a healthy diet can help to keep blood sugar levels under control.
  • Eating right will help you stay healthy, but taking the right drugs can also be very important.
  • Insulin is used to regulate blood sugar. It is injected by healthcare professionals in order to mimic the effects of the hormone produced by the body, which prompts it to use glucose for energy.

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